By using this site you agree to the use of cookies for analytics, personalised content and social media

Welcome to Amdram.net - The Social Network for Amateur Theatre

Welcome to Amdram.net - The Social Network for Amateur Theatre
We offer a wide range of FREE services for individuals, groups and societies that are interested in amateur theatre, amateur dramatics and amateur drama

If you're offering professional services then you may want to consider our "Sponsor Subscription" which is only 99p per year

Blogs

Our community blogs

  1. Amdram.net - The Social Network for Amateur Theatre has undergone significant change over the Christmas period and whilst the functionality the site offers remains largely unchanged we have undertaken a major upgrade to the software that underpins the site.

    What can you expect from Amdram.net - The Social Network in Amateur Theatre in 2016

    Groups - We've upgraded the group functionality on the site to allow "Group Owners@ to manage their groups and their own forums much in the way that Facebook allows Page administrators to manage pages - We have plans to enhance the group functionality further but are keen to get feedback on what groups and users would like to see

    Calendar - We still offer the same great event functionality that you've enjoyed before but we've enhanced the integration with Google Maps so that you easily add a location for your event and we've also made it easier for you to link to publicity material that you can store in the gallery and reuse throughout Amdram.net

    Scripts - We're still growing our scripts database and we are keen to get feedback on what groups and users would like to see.

    Forums, Galleries & Blogs - We still offer the same great forums and blogs functionality, it has been enhanced and made easier to use

    Please feel free to comment or create a topic in the Feedback forum with any ideas or suggestions that you have

     

  2. gabbs
    Latest Entry

    Oklahoma  by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II

     In association with Bookham Light Operatic Society
    directed by Jackie Shearer
    Wednesday 17 to Saturday 20 May 7.30 and Saturday matinee 2.30
    Tickets: adults £16, children/students £12,

    The rivalry between farmers and cowboys provides the backdrop to the love story of cowboy Curly and farmer’s daughter Lauren and the road to statehood for Oklahoma.  Truly one of the greatest musicals of the 40s and 50s era and since.

    The post Oklahoma appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


  3. The trailer for The South Devon Players Theatre & Film Company, Brixham first ever feature film “Mordred”, is out – and the main film is now in editing with the vast majority filmed. There are a few extra shoots we will need to do next year, but its coming on wonderfully, with an epic team of Southwest people both sides of the camera 1f642.png

    (we do have a completion crowdfund, in the video blurb, to raise funds for filming those last few scenes and would be so grateful for any shares or support.)

    Like what you see? please check out our PostProduction fund at Indiegogo: https://igg.me/at/mordredcomplete to help us get the film finished.

    “Mordred”, is a gritty Arthurian drama, telling the legends from the point of view of Arthur’s much vilified illegitimate son, set in the 6th Century, drawing heavily from very early sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Welsh Triads, the Mabinogion, and local legends in Devon & Cornwall, as well as more recent medieval sources. This drama is set in the 530s, against the backdrop of the Saxon invasions, heavily influenced by Celtic legends, Druidic traditions, and the earliest tales of Arthur, and his followers.

    The South Devon Players Theatre & Film Company, are a team who have run in South Devon, England, since 2005-6. Founded to create theatre shows based on history and legends, we have more recently expanded into film as well,

     

    For more info on us: __________________

    www.southdevonplayers.com
    Facebook & Twitter: @sdevonplayers
    Instagram: sdevonplayers1
    email sdevonplayers@gmail.com
    Youtube: southdevonplayers

  4. The trailer for The South Devon Players Theatre & Film Company, Brixham first ever feature film “Mordred”, is out – and the main film is now in editing with the vast majority filmed. There are a few extra shoots we will need to do next year, but its coming on wonderfully, with an epic team of Southwest people both sides of the camera 1f642.png

    (we do have a completion crowdfund, in the video blurb, to raise funds for filming those last few scenes and would be so grateful for any shares or support.)

    Like what you see? please check out our PostProduction fund at Indiegogo: https://igg.me/at/mordredcomplete to help us get the film finished.

    “Mordred”, is a gritty Arthurian drama, telling the legends from the point of view of Arthur’s much vilified illegitimate son, set in the 6th Century, drawing heavily from very early sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Welsh Triads, the Mabinogion, and local legends in Devon & Cornwall, as well as more recent medieval sources. This drama is set in the 530s, against the backdrop of the Saxon invasions, heavily influenced by Celtic legends, Druidic traditions, and the earliest tales of Arthur, and his followers.

    The South Devon Players Theatre & Film Company, are a team who have run in South Devon, England, since 2005-6. Founded to create theatre shows based on history and legends, we have more recently expanded into film as well,

     

    For more info on us: __________________

    www.southdevonplayers.com
    Facebook & Twitter: @sdevonplayers
    Instagram: sdevonplayers1
    email sdevonplayers@gmail.com
    Youtube: southdevonplayers

  5. YAT will next meet at St Peter & St Paul Church Hall, Teddington from 7.30pm on Monday 22 August 2016 where we will be holding a discussion and reading for our Autumn production, Titanic the Musical.


    • 3
      entries
    • 0
      comments
    • 2283
      views

    Recent Entries

    SouthendODS
    Latest Entry

    Palace Theatre

    16th-19th November 2016

     

    It’s the tail end of the big, bad 1980s in Hollywood, and the party has been raging hard. Aqua Net, Lycra, lace and liquor flow freely at one of the Sunset Strips last legendary venues, a place where sex machine Stacee Jaxx takes the stage and scantily clad groupies line up to turn their fantasies into reality. Amidst the madness, aspiring rock star (and resident toilet cleaner) Drew longs to take the stage as the next big thing (and longs for small-town girl Sherri, fresh off the bus from Kansas with stars in her eyes). But the rock and roll fairy-tale is about to end when German developers sweep into town with plans to turn the fabled Strip into just another capitalist strip mall. Can Drew, Sherri and the gang save the strip – and themselves – before it’s too late?

     

    The following performance contains strong language and sexual references throughout.

     

     

    TIMES AND TICKETS

    Wed and Thurs Evenings 8pm £17.00
    Fri and Sat Evenings 8pm £18.00

    Fri Matinee 5pm £17.00

    Sat Matinee 2:30pm £14.00


    *A £1 Booking Fee will be added at the Box Office*


    Evening performances only: Groups 10-19 10% off | Groups 20+ 15% off

     

     

    Palace Theatre Box Office: 01702 351135

    https://southendtheatres.org.uk

     

    Palace Theatre

    430 London Road,

    Westcliff-on-Sea,

    Essex

    SS0 9LA

     

    In order to get the best seats please email the SODS Advance Box Office at sodstickets@hotmail.co.uk (Until 1st September 2016).

     

     

     

    “Rock of Ages” is based on a book by Chris D’Arionzo.

    Arrangements and Orchestration by Ethan Popp.

    This is an Amateur Production. Presented in arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH LTD.

     

     

    Watch our Rock of Ages Behind the Scenes series here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sswgg7yr15g

    ROAAvatar.jpg

  6. I’m guilty of going to see ‘Butterflies are Free’ on opening night. I’ll be honest, I went because I wanted to support director, Maggie Campbell, with whom I had many a laugh in her production of ‘As You Like It’ … Continue reading


  7. Auditions:

    Who: Purple theatre company

    What: noel cowards "hayfever"

    When:Sunday, 16 February 2014 10:00 until 16:00

    Where:2nd Uxbridge Scout Hut, Gatting Way, off Park Road in Uxbridge

    (Nearest tube station, uxbridge - Piccadilly line. Nearest bus stops - U1,U2)

    About the show:

    The eccentric Bliss family were never inclined to consider social conventions. Perhaps it is not surprising that Judith, a 'retired' actress, David, a novelist, and their two equally bohemian children have each invited a guest for the weekend but neglected to tell anyone else! When the unfortunate guests arrive, they find themselves alternately amused, embarrassed, humiliated and ignored as their hosts continue to behave just as they please. How will their visitors cope with being thrown into the melodramatic scenes which form a natural part of their hosts' daily life?

    What we're after:

    We are seeking a cast of nine - five women, four men, with a fairly broad age range available.

    We will also be seeking willing volunteers to assist with staging this fine production - come along to the auditions and you will find the crew team lurking with a cup of tea and a biscuit.

    About the audition:

    Auditions start at 10.30am prompt, and will run until approx 4pm with a one hour lunchbreak. Further details can be found on our website, but attached is a handy FAQ list

    FAQ list:

    What happens at a Purple audition?

    The general way things go at an audition for Purple is that we try to make everyone feel welcome by conducting games/group exercises in the morning to start off. This helps our auditionees to relax a little, along with giving people the chance to get to know each other. This is then followed by an introduction to the play before we break for lunch. Then we get into the serious stuff of the auditions during the afternoon. The process can vary depending on the production/director in question. Once the auditions are over, most of us then congregate at a nearby pub.

    So what happens after that?

    The director and assistant director would then discuss the auditions and make their casting choices based on what they saw before sending out the full list to people. This would normally take a couple of days.

    Do I need to prepare anything for the audition?

    No. We will provide character audition pieces for everyone to read through, giving people the chance to decide what part(s) they would like to audition for. All you would need to bring with you is yourself and a bucketload of enthusiasm!

    Do I need to have acting experience in order to audition?

    Again, no. We welcome people of all experiences, whether you have spent your entire life on stage or this is your first ever audition. If you have the desire to get involved, Purple will provide the opportunity for you.

    Should I bring lunch, or will Purple Theatre provide for me?

    We will take a break in between auditions so people can go out and get some lunch, but some people do bring their own so it is up to you. Purple Theatre doesn’t provide lunch for auditionees. However, we do offer as much tea and coffee as you can drink and some of our members have been inclined to bring in cake to share with everyone! It is also worth noting that the bringing in of cake is welcomed entirely by Purple, but it won’t get you the role you want!

    What if I can’t make the date in question at all but still want to audition?

    Again, you need to contact us in advance by email. The director(s) will then get in touch with you to discuss an alternative date before the audition in which you can attend. Contact details are provided below.

    Do I have to come for the whole day of auditions or can I just be there for the afternoon?

    It is strongly recommended that people who wish to audition turn up for the whole day as the group exercises are beneficial to help you prepare, as well as giving you the chance to talk to people and find out more about the play in question. If you can’t make the whole day, you need to contact us in advance, as it might be easier to arrange an alternative date.

    Is there a fee to audition?

    No. We only charge people if they get a part in the show in question, as they would then have to become members of Purple Theatre.

    So what are the membership fees if I do join Purple Theatre?

    Membership fees are £25 for one full year from July-June. If you join halfway through the year the fee is reduced to only £15. In addition, there is a show fee of £20 per person.

    Will I get paid for my involvement in the show?

    No. Purple Theatre is a voluntary group and we rely on our membership to help with the costs of running the company, as well as grants from Hillingdon Council.

    What about those of us who wish to get involved with Purple Theatre but don’t want to be on stage?

    Fear not, there are opportunities for people to get involved with our productions behind the scenes. These involve roles such as backstage crew, lighting, sound, costume, props, set design and construction, the list goes on! If that sounds more like your cup of tea then you can still come down to the auditions as there will be a separate crew call for those who wish to get involved this way. Contact details will be provided at the bottom of this page.

    Is there an age limit for Purple?

    Yes, there is. We only allow people 18 years or over to be involved with Purple Theatre, as we don’t have a licence for children. However, this is the only requirement that we ask of our members.

    Well, this all sounds great. So when are the auditions and what time?

    Auditions for Hay Fever are on Sunday 16th February. Turn up from 10am for a 10.30am start and we will run through until approx 4pm.

    So where can I find you guys?

    The auditions will be held at the 2nd Uxbridge Scout Hut on Gatting Way in Uxbridge. It can be found just up the road from Uxbridge College, and is served by the U1 and U2 bus routes.

    Is there parking available?

    There is some parking available at the Scout Hut but it is rather limited. Alternatively, you can park on one of the side streets nearby.

    You haven’t really answered my question here. How can I get in touch with you in order to find out my answer?

    You can get in touch with us via our website – www.purpletheatre.org.uk. Alternatively you can email us at the following addresses:

    General Purple enquiries: company.manager@purpletheatre.org.uk

    Membership enquiries: treasurer@purpletheare.org.uk

    Hayfever production/audition enquiries:

    You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter, just search “Purple Theatre ''

  8. blogentry-3953-0-66546300-1366806889_thu

    What is a woman to do? Seek love and self-fulfilment by abandoning a rotten husband, or obey society’s rules and devote herself to her family?

    That’s the dilemma facing Mrs Alving in Henrik Ibsen’s ‘Ghosts’, which comes to north Leeds this week in a new production by theatre group Adel Players.

    Having followed the call of duty throughout her married life, Mrs Alving is now choosing to build an orphanage near her home to honour her dead husband. But the return of her son Oswald, combined with the priggish advice of Pastor Manders, results in a series of revelations that threaten to shatter the veneers of respectability they have all created for themselves.

    Poignant, laughable and very moving, ‘Ghosts’ touches nerves that are as sensitive today as they were a century ago – and audiences old and new are sure to be startled by the power of this particular version.

    Adel Players are reaping the benefits of recent staging and lighting upgrades at the Memorial Hall, and the ingenious set design – a conservatory overlooking a Norwegian fjord, illuminated by sunlight – brings a noticeable sense of place on this occasion, while the sharp attention to detail extends to the costumes too.

    Mrs Alving’s stoic attitude – having kept up appearances in spite of the misery of her marriage – is conveyed in a performance of considerable fortitude from Dianne Newby. Her dignity and resolve are tested by the self-satisfied Manders, here played with amusing moral rectitude by Rob Colbeck until the clergyman is faced with wavering uncertainty over decisions past, present and future. Oswald is able to chip away at Manders’ righteousness in an early scene and, as the play progresses, Chris Andrews as the son is thoroughly convincing as he confronts his personal demons.

    There is strong support from Helen Duce as Mrs Alving’s maid Regina and also David Pritchard as her father Engstrand, both characters offering light relief amid the encroaching darkness before the dramatic conclusion prompts decisions for them too.

    ‘Ghosts’ was branded sensational and scurrilous after its debut in the 1880s, and while society is much harder to shock these days, director Beth Duce has successfully captured what makes the play relevant to modern audiences. The moral maze faced by a wronged wife, the pomposity of the pastor, the fear and confusion of a young man – such human qualities will always be familiar. The path chosen by Mrs Alving and its cruel cost results in a theatrical experience that is haunting and gripping.

    ‘Ghosts’ is playing at Adel Memorial Hall, Church Lane, Adel, Leeds, LS16 8DE from Wednesday 24 to Saturday 27 April (starts 7.30pm). Tickets can be booked by phoning 0113 275 5585 or via the Adel Players’ website at http://www.adel-players.org.uk


  9. Gifts for Me and My Girl can include all kinds of variations on a theme of spoons, pearl buttons, coats of arms, aristocracy, cockneys, love and marriage.

    Tie+Clip+Vintage+Car+.JPG
    Classic Car Tie Slide



    And for Sir Jasper!




    Visit the website at thedramaqueensdrawers.co. for more suggestions and ideas.


    • 1
      entry
    • 0
      comments
    • 2191
      views

    Recent Entries

    New comedy now available as one act or full length version, See taster for details, or contact martin@vega.karoo.co.uk

  10. PCP_1268.jpg

    The Concise Oxford Dictionary defines the word ‘rehearsal’ as; ‘a trial performance or practice of a play’.

    Of course, whilst the definition is undoubtedly correct, a rehearsal is (or should be) so much more than that. It’s an opportunity to deepen your understanding of the play and the characters that inhabit it, to ensure the basics of presentation are in place and to finesse the performances of your actors. The whole rehearsal period should be considered as a journey with the opening night as the destination. Each rehearsal should have a feeling of momentum and progression; of consolidating what was done last time, but always moving forward to build on those foundations. The cast should be encouraged to give thought to their characters in their daily life, not just at rehearsals. Ask them to find the time to sit down for just ten minutes before each rehearsal and consider where they left off last time. This will be the starting point for their next rehearsal. Any time spent retreading old ground is time wasted. To this end, encourage your cast to write notes in their script (in pencil, as things will always change!), and to read them through once they get home.

    A director’s job is often construed to be about directing the actors. I would suggest that it is also just as much about directing the audience or, at least, directing their attention. The actors are in your hands, and it is your job to use them as the vehicle by which the play can make itself understood. As the rehearsals progress, ask yourself; Is that important piece of business with the coffee cup happening in plain view of the audience? Does is matter that a particular character is ‘masked’ by (i.e. standing behind) another at this particular point? Is the meaning of Character A’s line clear? What is Character B’s reaction to it? Always question, at a every moment, what is happening before you. Something may be clear to you and your cast after ten weeks’ rehearsal, but will it be clear to your audience after just one viewing?

    For all this, it is clear to me what a rehearsal is not. It is not simply an exercise in repetition. Running the same scene or act again and again without any feeling of moving forward and improving is likely to be a dispiriting experience for all concerned. Make a plan of what exactly you wish to achieve each evening. Be prepared to be flexible, but try not to get sidetracked. Explain to your cast what you expect to tackle that night. It may also be useful to let them in on your ‘overview’ of the rehearsal period. Are you planning to ‘block’ the play (i.e. set the characters’ movements) right though, then come back for more detailed work? Or are you ‘going to take a more ‘organic’ approach and block as you rehearse, thus keeping yourself open to every idea and eventuality? If the former, make sure you have blocked the play yourself as the actors will be looking to you for direction. Literally work through your script with a pencil before rehearsals start, indicating who will move where and at what point. Mark your script into sections which can easily be rehearsed and aim, as closely as possible, to stick to them.

    Ideally, I suspect you should aim for a mix of both. Time spent marking down your blocking beforehand will be useful, but be prepared to change your direction as the actors settle into their roles and discover for themselves when a particular movement is best made, or how a particular bit of business is best played. The confident director is happy to be flexible when needed but also has a strong vision of the play he wishes to stage.

    ______

    'Professional Tips for the Amateur Stage'; handy tips for actors and directors to help you prepare for your big night!

  11. <span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">Writing a novel, performing a play, penning a song or creating a piece of art – these are all great achievements that you probably want to shout about from the rooftops. Friends, family, work colleagues: they will want to know, and it’s easy enough to tell them. But how do you tell the wider world about your work? The answer is – you use the media. And news (or press) releases are a simple, but very effective, way of doing this.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /></span><br /><span style="font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;"><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">So, what do I mean by a news release? Well, the best way to describe it is a news story about you, or your group, that you want to share with a particular audience. You draft it, edit it, finalise it and then send copies to journalists (who, for example, cover your local area, your particular genre, or arts in general). The journalist reads it, hopefully takes an interest, and, if all goes well, you’ll end up with some free coverage of your masterpiece. That means more people buying your book, watching your play, listening to your song or coming to gaze upon your art.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">I’ve been writing news releases for nearly 20 years, and it’s definitely a skill that improves with practice. But it is not that difficult to become a good news release writer in a relatively short space of time. To help you do that, I’ve listed some top tips for writing great news releases:</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">News</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – this might sound obvious, but the key ingredient for a news release is <em>news</em> – something new that someone, somewhere, is going to be interested in, or needs to know about. Issuing a release about the recent/imminent publication of your next novel <em>is</em>news. Wait six months, and it almost certainly <em>isn’t</em> news. Selling the 5,527<sup>th</sup>copy of your book isn’t news, but your 10,000<sup>th</sup>sale is definitely potential news release material (the media love round numbers for some reason!). And, to use a rather tongue-in-cheek example, announcing the title of the <em>second</em> book in your trilogy is <em>only</em>going to be newsy if you’ve actually published the <em>first</em> one! It’s not an exact science, for example, the more high-profile you are, the less newsy your news needs to be. But give everything you want to announce this “news check”. Issuing a non-newsy release is a sure-fire way to get your future news releases filed in the bin, so don’t be tempted to send one out. Oh, and don’t forget to put the date on your release – so people know it’s a current news story.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">The Headline</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – you need a good, relevant headline to grab a journalist’s attention. ‘My book’s on sale now’ isn’t going to send anyone’s pulse racing. However, ‘Watford playwright’s debut novel hits the shelves this weekend’ sounds a lot more exciting, even though it’s really just saying the same thing! Keep it short and snappy, and make sure it is understandable to everyone. Humour is good, as long as it’s appropriate and not too facile. When you’re thinking of your headline, try thinking of it as the advertising slogan for your release – it’s probably competing with lots of other releases in the journalist’s inbox, so your headline needs to shout louder than the rest! If it’s a really good headline, it might even be used by the journalist (though journalists like to use their own headlines to differentiate their article from others, so it’s not very common).</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">The Opening Paragraph</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – now your headline has got the journalist’s interest, you’ve got to tell them your news. And this should be clearly explained in an opening paragraph of no more than around 25-30 words. Use snappy, active language where possible, but tell the story. It should be a paragraph that could stand alone from the rest of your release, and be completely understandable. For example, “Watford playwright Paul Mathews has swapped the stage for the page, with the publication this week of his first e-novel ‘We’ve Lost the President’ on amazon.co.uk.” (N.B. In case you’re wondering, I haven’t written the book yet, but it is my working title!) Background should be in “Notes for editors” (see below) at the end of the release, so don’t make the mistake of starting your release with a biog or a list of your previous glories.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">The Main Release</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – this is your opportunity to give more details about your news. Keep the information in a logical order and avoid overly long paragraphs or sentences (just as good writers always do). You should make sure the release includes a good description of your artistic endeavours, relevant websites/hyperlinks where people can get further information, contact numbers (for booking tickets for plays, exhibitions etc), a good quote from yourself or other relevant person, and numbered “Notes for editors” where you include useful background information, such as a detailed biog, your social media IDs, past artistic triumphs and your contact details (for the journalist).</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">Golden Rules</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – there are a few golden rules to abide by, when drafting a news release. Firstly, always avoid jargon or slang – it will confuse journalists and, potentially, your audience (though a jargon-filled news release is unlikely to generate any coverage). Secondly, if you’re using acronyms, make sure you always spell the full name out first, with the acronym in brackets immediately after; you can then subsequently refer to the acronym. Thirdly, always get someone else to proof-read your release, as a second pair of eyes is essential to spot little mistakes and errors that can give it an unprofessional look. Finally, try to keep your language “active”, rather than “passive”. It’s easiest to explain this with an example:</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">ACTIVE</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – Local author Paul Mathews has published a novel.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">PASSIVE</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – A novel has been published by local author Paul Mathews.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">The active is more dynamic and interesting. The passive is generally to be avoided at all costs, as it is clunky and sleep-inducing.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">An Example</span></b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"> – here is a very simple example of a news release that takes on board all that I’ve said above. It is a news release to publicise a book that I am planning to write, but haven't written yet! (This shows that you can actually start your publicity preparations well in advance of actually finishing your work of art.)</span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">29 March 2013</span></b><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">Watford playwright’s debut novel hits the shelves this weekend</span></b><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">Watford playwright Paul Mathews has swapped the stage for the page, with the publication this weekend of his first e-novel, ‘We’ve Lost the President’, on amazon.co.uk.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">Paul, 40, has set his debut novel 50 years in the future, where Great Britain is now a Republic, ruled by a fun-loving, globally-adored French President who has disappeared without trace overnight.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">With the President’s annual Independence Day address just 48 hours away, and underground Monarchist groups threatening mass riots, public relations (PR) guru George Greener reluctantly takes on the task of finding his boss, armed only with a copy of the President’s diary and a good supply of boiled sweets. Can George unravel the Presidential mystery, using his skill, guile and a bit of PR know-how, before chaos hits the streets of late 21st-century London?</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">Speaking at the launch of his book, Paul said:</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">“The London I’ve created in 2066 is a very different place from the vibrant city we know today, but still recognisable to anyone who has lived, worked or travelled there.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">“And, while set 50 years in the future, it contains characters who have many of the issues, problems and hang-ups that we do in 2013. These include the main character, George, who, like me, is a PR professional. However, the similarities end there, as he is very much his own man, as you’ll find out when you read the book.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">“Everyone loves a good mystery story, and what better mystery than a missing President – and a French one in charge of the British, just to make it more interesting!”</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">‘We’ve Lost the President’ can be purchased online at amazon.co.uk.</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><b><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">Notes for editors</span></b><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">1) You can follow Paul Mathews on Twitter @Watford_Writer and read his blog at watfordwriter.blogspot.co.uk</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">2) Paul works as a Senior Press Officer in London, and has worked in PR for almost 20 years. He studied Philosophy at Cambridge University and holds a Diploma in International Public Relations (DIPR).</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">3) Contact Details (for media only): Paul Mathews +44 (0)XXX XXX XXX</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; font-size: 18pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;">So, I hope that’s given you a steer in the “write” direction, when it comes to writing news releases. Good luck!</span><span style="font-family: "Times New Roman","serif"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-language: EN-GB;"><o:p></o:p></span></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><em>If you enjoyed this blog, follow me on Twitter @Watford_Writer<o:p></o:p></em></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span><br /><div class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: normal; margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><o:p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: small;"> </span></o:p></div><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;"> </span></span><br />

    Source

  12. blog-0176350001344924821.jpgI’ve been doing some research into the Messina of Much Ado, trying to understand the context of the play, especially with regard to the director’s suggestion that Leonato might be played as a sort of Godfather figure.

    I already knew Messina was situated at the north east tip of Sicily, and I also knew that, at the time the play is set, Messina (and Sicily as a whole) was ruled by Spain. According to Wikipedia:

    “With the union of the crowns of
    and Aragon in 1479, Sicily was ruled directly by the kings of
    via governors and viceroys. In the ensuing centuries, authority on the island was to become concentrated amongst a small number of local barons... Local spheres of royal influence never were clearly defined, and various local political entities within the viceregal system competed for power, rendering Sicily often ungovernable.”

    Is this how the mafia originated, I wonder? With these baronial families competing for power? Not according to an article in a magazine called The Best of Sicily, which is dismissive of the idea. It says that, as an organisation, the Mafia did not come into being until sometime after 1700. Tales of its establishment as a "revolutionary" reaction against "foreign" domination are fanciful at best, it says, lacking in any historical foundation. On the other hand, again from Wikipedia: “The genesis of Cosa Nostra is hard to trace because mafiosi are very secretive and do not keep historical records of their own.” It seems likely that the mafia, as we think of it today, developed over many centuries. There is certainly evidence that Sicilians banded together in groups to protect themselves and carry out their own justice. The term “mafioso,” or Mafia member, initially had no criminal connotations and was originally used to refer to a person who was suspicious of central authority.

    But there was clearly no Sicilian “mafia” as we know it in existence at the time of Much Ado. Nevertheless, I have a picture of a pretty lawless feudal colony divided into small pockets of baronial power, constantly at loggerheads with each other. This would explain, perhaps, the presence of Don Pedro, prince of Aragon, on the island; sent by the King to put down the upstart barons. Or perhaps Don Pedro is there at the request of Leonato, the once-powerful governor who can no longer control the “various local political entities”. The prince’s army certainly set out from Messina – Claudio refers to that fact when he tells Don Pedro how his feelings for Leonato’s daughter have changed:

    O, my lord,

    When you went onward on this ended action,

    I look’d upon her with a soldier’s eye,

    That liked, but had a rougher task in hand

    Than to drive liking to the name of love:

    But now I am return’d and that war-thoughts

    Have left their places vacant, in their rooms

    Come thronging soft and delicate desires,

    All prompting me how fair young Hero is,

    Saying, I liked her ere I went to wars.

    Perhaps Don Pedro’s villainous half-bother, Don John the Bastard, was the instigator of an uprising? It’s possible.

    I find all this very useful in helping me to develop a “back story” for my character, Leonato. He is past his prime, unable to fight his own battles any more, and without a male heir. He is, at the start of the play at least, a sort of semi-retired Godfather, like Vito Corleone after he is gunned down.

    All of that changes, of course, at the wedding scene...

  13. Hello there, the internet, how are you?

    We are Gravesend & District Theatre Guild, an amateur theatre company from Kent. Recently, like most companies, we've been looking for ways to boost our profile in the local area, to encourage new members and new audiences. Therefore, we have embraced the wonderful world of social networking.

    We joined the Facebook "webolution" yonks ago and it's always been a really useful way of contacting our members en masse. I'm pretty sure there has been a little group created for every amateur production performed since FB was invented and it has made organising rehearsals and thing so much easier. However, it's a very insular site, designed for people to keep in touch with the people they already know, and if our little company is going to grow and develop then we need to start talking to new people as well, putting ourselves out on the ether, as it were.

    So, we've just got to grips with, and have rather fallen in love with, Twitter. For those of you that don't use it, Twitter is a little bit like a compacted Facebook. Users post little status updates in 140 characters or less and share them with their followers. 140 characters might not seem like a lot, but it's more than enough to write a little haiku, an advert for your production or auditions, or to say "Hey, check out this cat wearing glasses, lol". Meanwhile, you follow the people you want to and their "tweets". Pretty straight forward, huh?

    Our resident tweeter (we like to call her the Twitter Bunny) has been frantically adding local arts companies, other amdram-mers, useful people and old members and it's been such a lovely, immediate way of reaching out to people. It's intimate, yet public. We can shamelessly plug our shows and auditions, while at the same time, getting to know our followers and followees (or "tweeps", as TB tells us they are called).

    Our favourite twitter discoveries so far have been: @indywood, a guy from Kent who is crowd funding a zombie film and has raised over £65000 so far: @MarkBowsherFilm, a former member of our youth group who has just been to L.A. to pick up an award for his first short film: @artof_movement, a Gravesend based arts project working with school children and residents of a local Old Folks Home: and about a million and one other exciting people doing exciting things. Oh, and amdram.net… we found them on Twitter too ;)

    So, if you are yet to join the wonderful world of Twitter, we suggest you get to it. It takes a little while to get used to, but it has really opened our eyes to the enormous wealth of fabulous people doing fabulous, inspiring things in our local area. If you decide to take the leap, find us at @theatre_guild. Twitter Bunny is always looking for new tweeps and loves a good chat.

    We promise, it's not all pictures of cats wearing glasses…. Well, not all the time.

  14. Just like every other person in the entire world, I receive my own fair share of SPAM

    However, I decided to undertake an experiment where I would “generate” an email address for each organisation or company that I shared information with
    e.g. f7s8d7sdhsjdhs88@myhiddendomain.com = The ABC Company

    It is possible that someone guessed one of these email addresses but I’d like to think that is relatively unlikely!

    I’ve been extremely careful when sharing my “generated” email addresses with companies, always opting out of all of the marketing options, I figured this way I should not receive a single email on any of these email addresses that I was not already expecting.

    Interestingly, on the whole the experiment has been very successful, I’ve shared my email addresses with lots of different companies and generally not had any problems!

    BUT… There has been a few notable exceptions to the rule:-

    A large UK holiday company which has a German parent company, often refers to itself as Number 1
    Yes, this company has shared my email address with just about every other organisation on the planet, I’ve had emails from Bingo Online through to Solar Panels

    I can’t help but think you’ve either sold my information… or you’ve had your information compromised

    A large website that estate agents use to sell your house on
    OK, there a few sites that do this but I think this is the main one, I’m ever so glad that you’ve shared my address with every estate agent on the planet and also found it necessary to share my information with every partner on the planet. It’s always interesting getting an email from a random estate agent, especially annoying when they provide unsubscribe links that don’t work!

    I don’t think you’ve sold my information but you’ve clearly shared it with just about everyone

    I’m still pondering whether to file a complaint with the Information Commissioner…



    Source
    • 1
      entry
    • 2
      comments
    • 3484
      views

    Recent Entries

    blog-0373453001336990992.jpgWe're pulling up to the last week of rehearsals proper on our contemporary G&S musical and will be running the 'tech' next Sunday, so it's all go. However, we're finding, unusually, that ticket sales are considerably down on our average and it begs the age-old question - can we amateur groups afford to stage new, untested plays and musicals?

    Our traditional musical slots have always been filled with the popular staples - Calamity Jane, Kiss Me Kate, Forum etc. but we were impressed by Andrew G. Marshall's brilliant new musical play 'Modern Major General' and felt that we could bring it to our loyal audience. The favourite tunes are given new life and the narrative is a fun tale of two operatic groups competing for love and a silver rose bowl.

    We could, of course, have simply (!) staged a G&S operetta but we felt confident enough to attract the G&S fans and also those who had perhaps no interest in G&S - but have we fallen between the two posts?

    It would be shame for good, new material not to have a life amongst the old favourites, especially as amateur groups should be given good material to work with rather than re-staging those musicals that everyone knows. Do we take the risk in this economic climate with untried material?

    Having said all that, we're very pleased with the excellent production - a cast of 24 and many talented behind the scenes volunteers all wrangled by our musical director Lesley Nicholls have really pulled off a great, fun show. It would be such a shame that much of our usual audience won't get a chance to see a very rewarding production and a guaranteed fun evening.

    We'd love your thoughts and experience. Do we try it again, or do we play safe and break no new ground?

    Pop along to hartleyartsgroup.com to take a peek.

    • 1
      entry
    • 0
      comments
    • 2909
      views

    Recent Entries

    As of last night the latest offering from Stage-Door theatre company is over and done with. The last production of the tense thriller Cat's Cradle came to a close, and the cast have finally gone our separate ways.

    The show itself was an interesting one. For the first night in the entire weeks run the audience seemed to pick up on every single humorous aside and at times it felt more like we were putting on a comedy thriller instead.

    Needless to say the audience seemed to enjoy every minute of the show, as did the cast and at the after show party there were many people who were very sad to see the back of the play.

    Of course, we're not going to have time to rest back on our heels as rehearsals for our next show, the exciting stage adaption of Jimmy Perry and David Croft's popular TV series "Hi de Hi" will begin on Wednesday. No rest for the wicked.

    Hi de Hi director Micki Darbyshire has already cast the show and they're all ready to leap in all guns blazing to put on, what will be our 39th show at Littlehampton's Windmill theatre.

    Yesterday we received the NODA report from their Sussex rep Jose Harrison, and it's now available on the Stage-Door wiki site located here as well as the announcement of who won the coveted Stage-Door Best Performance award for the show.

    Hopefully this is just the first of many blogs to this site about who we are and what we're doing, so we can get more information flying out to the theatre going public, but until next time, to quote the play, "Mind how you go."

  15. Monday 7th – Saturday 12th November 2011Show starts at 7:15pmMatineeSaturday 12th November 2011Show starts at 2:15pm Tickets on sale at John’s Newsagents, Railway Road, AdlingtonTicket Hotline 07507 012080

    Source

    • 1
      entry
    • 0
      comments
    • 7468
      views

    Recent Entries

    Rehearsals are going well for our next production, La Cage aux Folles, but we were not prepared for the amount of wigs there would be. If anyone in the Northern area has a wig stand they can loan us, please respond to this comment. We also need teletone taps either with the shoes or taken off, to be returned after production week.

    • 1
      entry
    • 1
      comment
    • 7815
      views

    Recent Entries

    Woodley Light Operatic Society in Berkshire is performing High Society in June 2011 and still needs to cast 2 men for Uncle Willie and Seth. Please see WLOS website for more details and who to contact. Hope to see you soon!

    • 1
      entry
    • 0
      comments
    • 7860
      views

    Recent Entries

    protostaa
    Latest Entry

    Hi can anyone help?

    we are in North London, we have a show coming up in February and have just found out our prop/backdrop hire company has gone bust !

    we are lookinf for cheap backdrop hire in and around Palmers Green N13, or anywhere North London. We need to hire for one week, a ballroom, a french ish town square, a garden or forest scene and maybe a dungeon.

    can any one help ?

    • 0
      entries
    • 0
      comments
    • 302
      views

    No blog entries yet

    • 0
      entries
    • 0
      comments
    • 5948
      views

    No blog entries yet

    • 0
      entries
    • 0
      comments
    • 292
      views

    No blog entries yet

Amdram.net - The Social Network for Amateur Theatre

84 Fairview Drive, Adlington, Chorley, Lancashire PR6 9ST

If you need help: