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gabbs

The Nomads will be presenting Love Me Slender by Vanessa Brooks in July 2018.

A perceptive and comedic look at modern issue… Siobhan, the ‘Achiever of the Year’ inspires her hopeful new recruits in the Slim For Life dieting club.

  • Performance dates: 10-14 July 2018 at 7:30pm
  • Rehearsal days: TBC to suit

Audition dates:

  • Tuesday 27 March 7.45pm
  • Thursday 29 March 7.45pm
  • Wednesday 4 April 7.45pm

Auditions will be held in the Bob King room at The Nomad Theatre, Bishopsmead Parade, East Horsley, Leatherhead, Surrey KT24 6RT (click here)

If you are interested in auditioning and/or would like further information, please email us to let us know on annabelle.nomads@gmail.com or call Moyra on 07771 757625.

Characters:

Playing ages aren’t too important, with the exception of Kelly – neither are “sizes” as we can costume to suit requirements!

  • Siobhan – 30/40’s, Group Leader. Target Weight: Maintained it for 2 years “…and so will you”. She is slim and attractive. Totally absorbed by the programme and is dictatorial and controlling. She also has a darker side.
  • Claudette – 40’s, Hotel bar Manager. Mancunian. Target weight: A Turquoise mini skirt and for her daughter not to be ashamed of her. She is overweight.
  • Lucinda – 30’s, Marketing Manager. Target weight: £40K a year and an executive chair. She is aiming for size 10 and is only 10 pounds over. Desperate for promotion.
  • Rosie – Church worker. Lives with an ailing mother. Target weight: A slim third finger and that one small world. Rosie is slightly overweight.
  • Celia -60’s Retired housewife. Target weight: Room in the waist band for an extra post bridge scone and room in her husband’s life for her. She is fun and mad. Wants to lose weight so she can go on walking holiday with husband and a friend.
  • Jean – 40/50’s Part time wife, mother and chronic over worker. Target weight: “the confidence to make an independent decision. I think.” Jean is slim has lost 4 stone!
  • Kelly – 20’s unemployed. Target weight: Transparency. She is slim.

The post Casting now – Love Me Slender appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

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Come along and join us on Saturday March 10th at 7pm for a great fun social evening.
It’s an opportunity to meet up with old friends and make some new ones in the new Bob King Room.
The Bar will be open and we will be serving complimentary nibbles.
You will hear about two of our future productions (including “Love me Slender” which we will be casting soon) and learn about some exciting partnerships to publicize our wonderful Theatre.
Paul Asher will be “breaking the ice” with a one of a kind entertainment.

RSVP to annabelle.nomads@gmail.com or on this Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/333274507185974/

The post Club Night – 10th March appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Freewheelers Easter Showcase

Wednesday 21st March @ 7.30pm

Tickets: £12
Concessions: £6
Carers go free – please contact the box office
Limited Wheelchair spaces available – please contact the box office

Box office: 01483 284747

Our box office is open on Saturday’s 10.30am – 12 noon. AT all other times, please leave a voicemail with your name and telephone number, clearly stating your requirements and we will call you back.

Online box office: www.ticketsource.co.uk/nomadtheatre

Join the Freewheelers at our Easter Showcase for an evening of Dance, Drama, Film and Music presented by our weekly workshop groups. From incredible improvised dances to hilarious Roman radio plays and live musical medleys, our creative programme promises to entertain!

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The post Freewheelers Easter Showcase appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Shakers

By John Godber and Jane Thornton

14-17 February 2018

Directed by Michael Ayres

“This companion piece to John Godber’s ‘Bouncers’ (written by him and his wife Jane Thornton), was set in a cocktail bar somewhere in the north of England during the Thatcher years, but could easily have been a comment on austerity Britain and the #metoo movement.

shakers review surrey theatre
The cast was made up of four actresses, who each spend almost the entire 90 minutes on stage and between them play a wide variety of parts related to the cocktail bar. Each has a core role as one of the waitresses in the bar and then also had several cameo roles – male and female – ranging from the girls celebrating a 21st birthday party, young couples on a big night out through to the TV executives taking advantage of “happy hour”.

Each character gave a monologue during the action which illustrated the living, breathing aspects of their lived lives as human beings, in contrast to the sneering, condescending customers who called them ‘lovey’, made tiresome innuendoes and saw in them distortions of their own tawdry fantasies.

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The director, Michael Ayres, had gathered a strong cast to represent the waitresses. Carol (played with an affecting world weariness by Nikki Kirkup), has a degree and urges the other girls to make something of themselves and not waste their lives on men. Nicky, admirably played by Laura Spalding, yearning to be an actress showed confidence, – until faced with an audition. Adele (Hayley Clines with an impressive reprtoire of facial expressions told us of her first sexual encounter, – at age 16, with her teacher which led to an abortion. Mel, young, sarcastic and embittered by life, was wonderfully played by Lucy Hamilton.

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As an ensemble the actresses showed us how the friends supported each other and clung on to their self respect and belief in something, maybe, a little better than they had in the bar.

The Nomads’ decision to stage the play in the cramped (Ed: some might say “intimate”!) Studio was an excellent one. The audience being in the midst of the smoky atmosphere. Sound, and choice of music was spot on, and brought new romantic (was it?), nostalgia to the play. The minimal set was well wrought too, showing enough of a, slightly seedy, cocktail bar but allowing us to concentrate on the people who populated the space. A nice touch was the velvet roped entrance to the club in the Nomads (real), bar with a DJ’d doorman to lead us through the light festooned (very ’80’s!), corridor into ‘Shakers’. And can I have been the only audience member to have got in to the spirit of the play with a pre-show ‘Greenroom Gloomraiser’ cocktail?

Thank you Nomads!”

As seen by Amdramfan

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The post Review: Shakers (by AmDramFan) appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

NODA representative, Mark Allen, reviews the recent production of  Dick Whittingon and his cat by The Nomads at The Nomad Theatre in Surrey (find us).

The NOMADS – “Dick Whittington and his cat”

Nomad Theatre – 13th December, 2017

Author – Peter Denyer
Director – Andrew Hamel-Cooke
Choreography – Samantha Potten
Musical Director – Gareth Alber

Warmly welcomed by the front of house I was ushered into the bar and awaited meeting with Andrew, the director who extended his good wishes and requested we remain to meet the cast later. A refurbished and (purpose) rebuilt theatre, it was gratifying to see it almost full.

dick whittington review pantomime
Greeted with a relatively simple set which worked very well, the changes as they were, were slick and without much fuss. Well lit and with good sound too, the diction was clear and could be heard well above the three-piece band offset stage left.

dick whittington review pantomime surrey fairy

In true fashion the pantomime started and we were introduced to a motley cast of characters ably led by Sophie Johnstone as Dick, Daniel Shepherd, very boo worthy as
King Rat and the sweet and innocent Hayley Clines as [Fairy] Bow Bells, all three confident and audible.

dick whittington pantomime review dame
Michael Ayres played the dame Sarah the Cook, and seemed to be enjoying the role too, as was fairly evident. I liked the enthusiasm, it rubs off well!

dick whittington pantomime review
The cast and chorus were well drilled by Andrew Hamel-Cooke and the choreography (Samantha Potten) was well performed, and in the main all in time too! Again like Sarah the Cook, the chorus and associated cast (too many to mention) (Ed: see below for our comments!) were really enthusiastic and this came across well, helping the audience to a very good evenings entertainment.

dick whittington review pantomime surrey
Overall a really enjoyable evening, and well worth the drive to see it. Well done Andrew and well done Nomads.

Mark Allen
December 2017

The Nomads are members of NODA, which has a membership of 2500 amateur theatre groups and 3000 individual enthusiasts throughout the UK, staging musicals, operas, plays, concerts and pantomimes in a wide variety of performing venues, ranging from the country’s leading professional theatres to tiny village halls.

 

Editors comments

Unfortunately, the large cast meant that not everyone got a mention by name, but we wanted to add a few notes on their amazing performance!

Millie Jane Franks as Idle Jack was punchy, energetic and had fabulous stage presence!

Iain Watson (Alderman Fitzwarren) and Jeff Wightwick (Captain Cuttle) both embodied their characters with sincerity and humour.

As The Sultan of Morocco, Richard Peachey‘s accent work and nimble movement made for very lively scenes!

Sasha Plaché brought grace and wonderful singing to the part of Alice Fitzwarren.

King Neptune and his mermaid (Ricky Powell and Tilly Winford – not to be mixed up) were ethereal and deserving of the audience “oohs” and “aahs” under the sea.

Our not-very-dynamic duo of baddies, Gnashfang (Lisa Arnold) and Gnawbone (Johnny Diamond) were suitably nasty, horrible and comedic in equal measures.

Tommy The Cat played by Karolina Sepiak presented an amazing solo self-choreographed dance piece as well as plenty of laughs and cheers!

All the adults and children in the ensemble clearly worked very hard to present coordinated and energetic group songs and dances which the audience loved.

All of the production team should have a huge pat on the back too – costumes were fantastic as always,… make-up was striking and a great display of what Guildford College students can do,… props convincing and consistently well placed,… lighting enhanced the audience understanding of the story locations and sentiment,… sound kept the pace and humour of the scenes,… staging, flying and scene changes were slick,… and the chaperones kept all of us in check… not just the children!

dick whittington pantomime review surrey millie jane franks idle jack

Millie Jane Franks as Idle Jack

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Sophie Johnstone and Karolina Sepiak as Dick and Tommy

dick whittington pantomime review baddies king rat

Daniel Shepherd, Lisa Arnold and Johnny Diamond as the baddie rat pack

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The band (L-R) – Vito, Ryszard and Gareth

dick whittington review pantomime

Richard Peachey as The Sultan of Morocco

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Ricky Powell and Tilly Winford under the sea

The post NODA review: Dick Whittington & his cat appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Much Ado About Nothing

By William Shakespeare

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke

Tuesday 9th to Saturday 13th October at 7.45pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10 (£12 for adults on the 9th)

A sharply witty romantic comedy – a battle of the sexes. As soldiers memories of conflict give way to a life of parties and masked balls, two fall madly, deeply in love, while another two reignite their own altogether more combative courtship.

 

The post Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Trivial Pursuits

Trivial Pursuits

By Frank Vickery

Directed by Michael Ayres

Wednesday 12 to Saturday 15 September at 7.45pm

Tickets: adults £12, children/students £10

At the summer meeting of the Trealaw and District Operatic Society, next season’s play is to be announced. The society’s business manager, Nick, runs into trouble, having promised a different show and the plum roles to four different people.

A comedic look at the world of amateur dramatics!

The post Trivial Pursuits appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Play In A Week celebrates 20 years in 2018!

Directed by Brandon McGuire

Performances 28 July at 7.30 and 29 July at 2.30

Tickets: £13

The Nomads annual week-long project for people with a range of physical and/or learning disabilities. A special play is commissioned each year with a unique part to suit every individual wanting to participate. Not to be missed!

The post Play In A Week 2018 appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Love Me Slender

By Vanessa Brooks

Directed by Clive Bowden

Tuesday 10th to Saturday 14th July at 7.30pm

Tickets: adults £14, students £10

Siobhan, the ‘Achiever of the Year’ inspires her hopeful new recruits in the Slim For Life dieting club. Siobhan has lost seven stone, found a new self, a fulfilling job and a wonderful husband. Now, she encourages others to achieve the same.

A perceptive and humorous look at modern issue.

The post Love Me Slender by Vanessa Brooks appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Charlotte’s Web

Nomes Youth Theatre presents

Charlotte’s Web

By EB White

Friday 29th June at 7pm, Saturday 30th June at 2pm and 7pm, Sunday 1st July at 2pm

Tickets: adults £14, children/students £10

We meet Charlotte, the spider, who is utterly determined to save her friend Wilbur, the pig.

Box office: 01483 284747

The post Charlotte’s Web appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

In association with Bookham Light Operatic Society

Annie Get Your Gun

By Irving Berlin, Dorothy & Herbert Fields

Directed by Andrew Hamel-Cooke

Musical Director, Selena Hegarty

Wednesday 16 to Saturday 19 May at 7.30, matinee on Saturday at 2.30

Tickets: adults £16, children/students £12

Annie Oakley and Frank Butler meet when she beats him in a sharpshooting contest at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and the two have to negotiate between their competitive sides and their blossoming love for each other.

Aimed straight at the heart, Berlin’s sensational musical from the Golden Age of Broadway includes such classics as “There’s No Business Like Show Business”, “Anything You Can Do” and “I Got The Sun In The Morning And The Moon At Night”.

Take a look at the review of the 2017 musical, Oklahoma – click here!

Box office: 01483 284747

The post Annie Get Your Gun in association with BLOS appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Show to be announced!

Friday 23rd March at 7.30pm

Saturday 24th March at 3.30pm

Tickets: adults £8, children/students £6

Nomes Youth Theatre is a fun and exciting youth theatre group based at the Nomad Theatre in East Horsley, Surrey.  We run classes for children and young people aged 4-18.

Find out more

 

The post Show by The Young Company (Nomes Youth Theatre) appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Auditions – Shakers

This 90 minute play is presented by four waitresses, Adele, Mel, Carol and Nicky, each under pressure in different ways, and describes a typical night at a bar called Shakers. The play is set in 1985, and has plenty of quick-fire humour as well as monologues by each character. The actresses play all the characters in the bar, including the clientele the four waitresses have to deal with.

  • Director: Michael Ayres
  • Performance dates: 13-17 February at 7:45pm
  • Rehearsals: Sunday / Wednesday / Friday

Audition dates:

  • Tuesday 9th January at 7.30pm
  • Friday 12th January at 7.30pm

Auditions will be held at The Nomad Theatre, Bishopsmead Parade, East Horsley, Leatherhead, Surrey KT24 6RT (click here)

If you are interested in auditioning and/or would like further information, please contact the Director on info@nomadtheatre.com

Characters

Shakers is an ensemble piece, with each actor playing equally featured roles. The playing age is 20s to 30s, but rapport between the actors is as important.

  • Adele is a single Mum, aching for a better life, but needs to make ends meet. She and Mel do not see eye to eye.
  • Carol is a graduate with aspirations which haven’t panned out – yet!
  • Mel is possibly a little older, worked in a pub before Shakers, quite likes working in a cocktail bar, and could be a little larger than average. Mel also plays a Scottish chef during the play.
  • Nicky – maybe a bit of peacemaker amongst the girls, she has aspirations to be a performer.

The post Auditions – Shakers appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Auditions – Annie Get Your Gun

Bookham Light Operatic Society‘s summer show will be ‘Annie Get Your Gun’, performed at The Nomad Theatre w/c 14th May 2018. Featuring classic show tunes such as ‘Anything You Can Do’ and ‘There’s No Business Like Show Business’, this musical is one of the greats!

  • Director: Andrew Hamel-Cooke
  • Musical Director: Selena Hegarty

Audition dates:

  • Friday 12th January at 7.30pm – Eastwick Road Church (URC), Eastwick Road, Great Bookham, Surrey KT23 4BE
  • Sunday 14th January at 3.30pm – The Nomad Theatre, Bishopsmead Parade, East Horsley, Leatherhead, Surrey KT24 6RT (Click here)
If you are interested in auditioning and/or would like further information, please contact the Director on 07747 527180 , or email and2hc@gmail.com

Audition pieces can be found at: http://www.bookhamlightoperatic.co.uk/blosauditions.htm

Synopsis

Rough-and-tumble Annie Oakley is the best shot around. A backwoods gal, Annie uses her skill to support her family by selling the game she hunts. When she’s discovered by Buffalo Bill and persuaded to join his Wild West Show, Annie is plucked from obscurity and becomes the toast of Europe. Annie meets her match in Frank Butler, Buffalo Bill’s leading man and star marksman. She falls head over heels for Frank, but soon eclipses him as the main attraction in the show. Her success with a gun makes trouble for Annie’s chance at romance. Annie Get Your Gun follows the journey of Annie and Frank, revealing their competitive natures as they vie for best shot – and each other’s hearts. This fictionalized version of the life of real-life sharpshooter Annie Oakley and her romance with Frank Butler boasts a score of Irving Berlin gems including “There’s No Business Like Show Business”, “I Got Lost in His Arms”, “I Got the Sun in the Mornin’”, “Anything You Can Do,” and “They Say It’s Wonderful.”

Characters – adults (with playing ages)

  • Frank Butler – Male 25-35 – Lead – Baritone. A suave sharpshooter in Buffolo Bill’s show – he enjoys his status
    as a heartbreaker and star.
  • Annie Oakley – Female 18-25 – Lead – Mezzo-Soprano. Strong singer-comedian who carries the show,  she immediately falls head over heels for Frank, who prefers a more dainty type of woman.
  • Tommy Keeler – Male 18-30 – Supporting – Tenor. A dashing young knife-thrower with the Wild West Show, part Native American.
  • Winnie Tate – Female 18-25 – Supporting – Mezzo-Soprano. Dolly’s 17-year-old sister. Tommy throws knives at her and hopes to marry her as soon as she turns 18.
  • Dolly Tate – Female 18-40 – Supporting – Alto.  Frank Butler’s “lovely” assistant, an ambitious and mean-spirited, but funny, woman.
  • Buffalo Bill Cody – Male 35-50 – Supporting – Baritone. Middle-aged soldier/Indian scout turned showman, runs the “Wild West Show”.
  • Chief Sitting Bull – Male 35-55 – Featured – Spoken.  leader of the Sioux Nation, adopts Annie as his daughter and puts his money into show business with the Wild West Show.
  • Charlie Davenport – Male 35-50 – Featured – Baritone.  Middle-aged manager of the Wild West Show, always setting the scene for this show-within-a-show.
  • Foster Wilson – Male 40-60 – Featured – Spoken. Hotel Manager,  strong personality with dry wit.
  • Pawnee Bill – Male 35-55 – Featured – Spoken.  Owner of the Far East Show; Buffalo Bill’s former partner and
    current rival.

Characters – youngsters

  • Little Jake – Male 11-14 – Featured – Alto. Annie’s 8-to-10-year-old brother, her “bird dog” who flushes out
    game for her to shoot.
  • Mary/Jessie/Nellie – Female 11-16 – Featured – Alto. Annie’s 10-to-14-year-old sisters, also part of the family hunting business.

Songs

  • Colonel Buffalo Bill — Charlie Davenport, Dolly Tate, and ensemble
  • I’m a Bad, Bad Man — Frank Butler
  • Doin’ What Comes Natur’lly — Annie Oakley and her siblings
  • The Girl That I Marry — Frank and Annie
  • You Can’t Get a Man with a Gun — Annie
  • There’s No Business Like Show Business — Frank, Buffalo Bill, Charlie, Annie, and ensemble
  • They Say It’s Wonderful — Annie and Frank
  • Moonshine Lullaby — Annie and siblings
  • I’ll Share It All With You — Winnie Tate and Tommy Keeler
  • Ballyhoo — Riding Mistress and Show People
  • There’s No Business Like Show Business (Reprise) — Annie
  • My Defenses Are Down — Frank and ensemble
  • Wild Horse Ceremonial Dance — Wild Horse, Indian Braves and Maidens
  • I’m an Indian, Too — Annie and ensemble
  • Adoption Dance — Annie, Wild Horse and Braves
  • I Got Lost In His Arms — Annie
  • Who Do You Love, I Hope — Winnie and Tommy
  • I Got the Sun in the Morning — Annie and ensemble
  • They Say It’s Wonderful (Reprise) — Annie and Frank
  • The Girl That I Marry (Reprise) — Frank
  • Anything You Can Do — Annie and Frank
  • There’s No Business Like Show Business (Reprise) — Ensemble

The post Auditions – Annie Get Your Gun (with BLOS) appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Theatre reviewer, Polly, provides this review of The Nomads 2017 pantomime, Dick Whittington & his cat

“Think Christmas and at some point you will think panto. It is about as much part of our British Christmas as Carols from King’s College and the Queen’s Speech. This kind of iconic position brings with it a certain expectation, of course. It is an uniquely British form of theatre and we have a formula which must be adhered to or it’s not a panto! The story is usually a fairy or traditional tale, there is always a baddie, there is always a goodie, there is always a lot of singing and dancing, there is some very obvious, groaningly obvious humour, a lot of double entendres to keep the parents awake, pyrotechnics if you can and huge spectacle especially in the last scene. I have not mentioned, of course, the audience participation. This is as formulaic as are the plots. The phrases such as “He’s/it’s
behind you!” or a particular phrase given us by one of the “helpful” characters; the panto dame always played by a man and the Principal Boy is always played by a woman. You have to be British to understand any of it. Perhaps something like cricket?

dick whittington pantomime review

So the expectation is high, but in the Nomad’s production of Dick Whittinton and his cat, they didn’t miss a trick. The programme itself promised a very high standard of things to come. Starting from the bottom, at least in height, I have to say that the young ratlets (Patrick Anderson, Ori Carr-Stein, Eden Garland, Amelia Tang and Ethan Tang) were terrific and the very youngest dancers were a delight. The choreographer, Samantha Potten did sterling work preparing her chorus of dancers (Alice Burgess, Caitlin Byrne, Ciara Byrne, Abigail Darke, Emily Davey, Amelia Potten, Katherine Warr, Sienna Wayland, Charlotte Weller and Francesca Woof.) I especially loved the more taxing and very difficult point work shown us by the older dancers. To top off the dancing, we had a panto dame, Sarah the Cook, played by Michael Ayres, who joined in the tap routine. Wonderful.

dick whittington pantomime review dame

Tap dancing wasn’t the only thing that the Dame was good at. ‘She’ spoke with great clarity, though some of the jokes might have benefitted from a little more exaggeration, but his/her make-up was wonderful. “Her” son Idle Jack played by Millie Jane Franks was a wonderfully drawn character, with hugely exaggerated facial expression and physical movement. It was “he” (another girl playing a chap!) who led the audience participation.

dick whittington pantomime review surrey millie jane franks idle jack

She put huge energy into getting us to respond standing up and repeating a little routine each time she came on. We were not a very good audience as we were a bit lazy about getting up and speaking the lines we had been
given. Speaking for myself, I was heavy with cold and recovering from ‘flu so getting up every two minutes did not get my vote, but that was just me. I’m sure with a slightly younger audience especially, there would have been no difficulty and Jack really did deserve more help than we gave her!

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Dick Whittington (Sophie Johnstone) spoke with great confidence and commitment and was a suitably glamorous and character. Dick and Alice had some very enjoyable duet and solo moments and between them kept the central story theme on track. They were an engaging couple.

dick whittington review sasha plache
Alice Fitzwarren (Sasha Plaché) was a very lovely young leading lady and she obviously enjoyed her role which communicated itself well to the audience. She obviously had her father, Alderman Fitzwarren (Iain Watson) in the palm of her hand as he quickly agreed to allow Dick to join the crew of his last surviving ship. The Alderman came across as an affable chap, who took his bad luck in his stride. He was kindly too to his officer in charge, Captain Cuttle played by Jeffrey Wightwick. Cuttle made good use of the silliness
when trying to call the crew to some order and made a significant contribution over all.

dick whittington review pantomime

Bit parts are the real fun of panto. You get to be there almost all the time but don’t have to worry too much about lines and Colin Barnard and Joshua Locke made full use of their
moments as the Arabs, the Sailors and in the general ensemble. King Neptune (Ricky Powell) in the beautiful underwater kingdom scene where we also met a delightful mermaid, played by Tilly Winford, was also a bit part well developed and delivered.

dick whittington review pantomime

Another high spot was the scene in the harem. Fabulous colours and sinuous choreography. The Sultan of Morocco (Richard Peachey) was every inch the part and gave us a lovely bit of singing although we could have done with a facemike at some moments. Nevertheless the scene was visually splendid and we enjoyed the sultan’s contribution .

dick whittington pantomime review baddies king rat
The “baddies” are what really make a panto and gives us the excuse to boo and hiss to our hearts content at their every entry. Gnashfang (Lisa Arnold) and Gnawbone (Johnny Diamond) were wonderfully evil and their immediate boss, King Rat (Daniel Shepherd) was truly superb. His performance was suitably horrible and very well sustained.

dick whittington review pantomime surrey fairy

In contrast to his nastiness, another must of panto is the Good Fairy Bow Bells (Hayley Clines) whose fluency and well pointed and delivered lines had us all enthralled. A
lovely performance.

dick whittington review pantomime cat
There is one supremely obvious omission in all this comment, and that is of Tommy, Dick’s faithful and hugely intelligent and clever cat which is pivotal to the progress of the story. Tommy was played by Karolina Sepiak and what a great job she made of it. There was total engagement throughout and her catlike movements were sustained at all times, but her real moment of glory came during Dick’s solo when she used the stage to its fullest extent and gave a terrific dance/gymnastic display, moments of which were absolutely jaw dropingly supple and a joy to watch.

dick whittington pantomime review band gareth alber
The scenes and costumes, always spectacularly good at the Nomads, were glorious. This was, over all, excellent ensemble playing, each player supporting the others and matching each other’s commitment to the success of the evening.
I had one or two issues with the general pace of the piece, but in the following performances I’m sure the actors will have bedded in to their performances as general confidence grows. The other slight grouse I should mention is that one has grown to expect that when there is an obvious joke in panto, one expects a “boom tish!” from percussion. That wasn’t quite as obvious, to my mind, as it might have been. The band, directed by Gareth Alber, however, were otherwise a great asset to the performance and provided sympathetic
support to the singing. One further niggle is that perhaps the flys could have been just a shade faster.

I am not usually a huge fan of pantos, but I really did enjoy this performance. The director, Andrew Hamel-Cooke and his army of back stage “beavers” such as lighting, props, stage manager to name but a few, are to be congratulated in bringing together so many players to produce such a great evening. We must remind ourselves that these are all people who give freely of their time to present us with high quality, local entertainment throughout the year. Thank you all. Your efforts are much appreciated.”

Polly

dick whittington review pantomime surrey

The post Dick Whittington – Polly reviews appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


gabbs

Showtime Singalong – with The Duffers & Gruffers Choir

Saturday 24th March 2018 at 7:30pm

In aid of Play In A Week 2018

Presenting songs from their favourite shows, the D&G Choir and their Musical Director, Martin Hall invite you to join them in a “Showtime Singalong” featuring songs from Oliver, My Fair Lady, The Sound of Music, Oklahoma, Carousel and many more.

You’ll have the words so you can join in a much or as little as you like. There will also be a selection pf special performances for you to sit back and enjoy!

This evening is open to everyone and will be raising funds for Play In A Week’s 20th anniversary production in 2018.

Tickets £12 via the box office on 01483 284747 or www.ticketsource.co.uk/nomadtheatre

choir showtunes musicals charity fundraising

About Play In A Week

Play In A Week is the Nomads annual week-long project for people with a range of physical and/or learning disabilities.
It enables actors with learning and/or physical disability to enjoy the magic and benefits of participating in a show and putting on 2 public performances every summer in our fully equipped and accessible modern theatre.

To achieve this, a cast of around 50 performers are backed by over 60 volunteers and specialist professionals. A special play is commissioned each year with a unique part to suit every individual wanting to participate.

New songs and music are composed, and dances choreographed to fit the script. Personal achievements since 1999 are both inspiring and humbling. Accessing performing arts and being part of this very special company has amazing benefits for our participants and volunteers, as well as providing great entertainment for our audiences!

Funding for this project comes primarily from donations and fundraising events which run throughout the year.

The post Showtime Singalong – with The Duffers & Gruffers Choir appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


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Shakers

By John Godber & Jane Thornton

Directed by Michael Ayres

Tuesday 13th – Saturday 17th 2018 (in the studio) at 7:30pm

In a not-so-chic London bar called Shakers, we meet Carol, Adele, Nicky and Mel, four friends who have taken to waitressing in desperation but who also have wit and resilience enough to never let any of the colorful characters they come across shake them up!

Box office 01483 284747

shakers play comedy eighties 80s

The post Shakers by John Godber & Jane Thornton appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


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Saturday 10th February, 2018 at 7:00 pm.

Our handcrafted Quiz Night is not your usual “pub quiz! Back by popular demand, the Play In A Week humorous, fun and thought provoking questions will entertain you while we raise funds. We try to level the playing field and have ‘something for everyone’ to answer.

Everyone is welcome! Teams are of up to 8(ish!), but you don’t have to bring a whole team in order to participate. We’ll find everyone a place at our friendly tables.

Tickets are £14 which includes a buffet supper. When you book, please tell us if you prefer meat or vegetarian option.

Book online – click HERE, or call 01483 284747.

About Play In a Week

Play In A Week is the Nomads annual week-long project for people with a range of physical and/or learning disabilities. It enables actors with learning and/or physical disability to enjoy the magic and benefits of participating in a show and putting on 2 public performances every summer in our fully equipped and accessible modern theatre.
To achieve this, a cast of around 50 performers are backed by over 60 volunteers and specialist professionals. A special play is commissioned each year with a unique part to suit every individual wanting to participate. New songs and music are composed, and dances choreographed to fit the
script.
Personal achievements since 1999 are both inspiring and humbling. Accessing performing arts and being part of this very special company has amazing benefits for our participants and volunteers, as well as providing great entertainment for our audiences!
Funding for this project comes primarily from donations and fundraising events which run throughout the year.
Want to get involved? You can contact us for a chat by these methods:
Email: admin@playinaweek.org.uk
Phone: 01372 726571
On Facebook please search for: @playinaweek

The post Play In A Week Quiz – Something For Everyone! appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


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Theatre reviewer, Polly, reviews Move Over Mrs Markham

“The very mention of the name Ray Cooney brings a smile to the face of anyone who has any experience of theatre. It was with such expectation that we took our seats at the Nomad Theatre on Thursday evening. We were not disappointed.

The opening musical theme prepared us for what was to come. The curtain rose on a wonderful set which evoked the period to a T. The ubiquitous Tretchikoff’s “Green Lady” the “Picasso” etc, sealed the moment in British fashion. The attention to detail in all Nomad sets is something to be
very proud of. It gives all the shows a feeling of professionalism and this set was “out there” with the best, It was detailed and beautifully observed.

move over mrs markham ray cooney set design art deco
The story of the very average couple whose flat becomes the focus of an hilarious tangle of events is laid out in the first act. The opening moments were, almost of necessity, a little slow and in no way prepared us for the absolute mayhem of what was to come in Act 2!!

move over mrs markham nikky kirkup matt weaver
We first met Mrs Markham (Nikky Kirkup) who was wearing a very snug fitting dress. She gave us a well drawn character of a very reasonable, supportive wife who was leading a very quiet,”normal” and blameless life. Her husband (Matt Weaver) was the very essence of the hard working, committed, slightly boring “grey man” or was it perhaps John Major making a surprise visit? Together they presented the face of an ordered married life. Fortunately for us, their employees, in the shape of the Interior Designer, the maid and their friends, were less ordered.

move over mrs markham ray cooney nathan farrell emily teitz
Nathan Farrell as Alistair Spenlow was excellent His presentation of a slightly camp but “up for it any time with any lady” was hilarious and very nicely balanced. His entry in a tangle of curtain fabric seemed like a metaphor for what was to come. I think this is the very best performance I have ever seen from Nathan. His interaction with the lovely Sylvie (Emily Tietz) was delightful.
Together they created some very funny moments and some moments of the nearest thing to true romance that we got in the play. She was particularly effective in Act 2, appearing as she did, in a very pretty lemon ‘shortie’ nightie. Just the kind of lady for an Interior Designer, attractive in every way.
move over mrs markham vykki mashVykky Mash as Linda Lodge was a delight. Her frothy and giggly, ‘teetering on high heels’ sort of character was beautifully sustained. (I once knew a young student just like that.) She kept me giggling with every appearance. Her interplay with Mrs Markham was always excellently fluent,
well projected and fluent. They played well against one another. Always believable and clear.

move over mrs markham simon openshaw
Linda’s husband, Henry Lodge (Simon Openshaw) cut a very urbane figure in his elegant blazer. He presented the very epitome of the ‘English chappie’; who likes a ‘bit of fun’ and fun he had galore. His delighting in ‘entertaining’ ladies served as a wonderful foil to his more sober partner, Philip Markham. Simon sustained this role with absolute conviction and confidence throughout. An excellent portrait of one of the key characters.
move over mrs markham judy
We had to wait until Act two to meet the other three characters. Olive Harriet Smythe was wonderfully well portrayed by Judy Abbott. This was a sensitively thought out character, played with absolute confidence and commitment. It was fortunate that she was such a very talented actor because her character was the pivot on which everything in Act 2 relied. I think we have all read about characters such as this, but it was wonderful to “meet” the real thing. It is a pity that the script did not allow us a moment with any of her canine friends. What fun that would have been!
move over mrs markham iain macfarlane
We learn in Act one that Linda was trying to wreak revenge on her straying husband by having a little ‘dalliance’ with Walter Pangbourne, (Iain MacFarlane). This sober, well at least for his first entry, gentleman, complete with bowler hat, rolled umbrella and bunch of flowers contributed wonderfully to the whole chaos of the second act. He seemed unphased by anything that was thrown at him even having to adjourn to the office below the flat for his bit of “slap and tickle “ with Linda. This was a smallish role, but he created a real, comic character with every entrance and utterance.
move over mrs markham samantha potten
That leaves us with Miss Wilkinson (Samantha Potten). Her first entry wearing rather forbidding glasses gave no hint of the lithe and foxy lady she became once the glasses were off. Again this was almost nothing much more that a cameo role but she made a most wonderful job of it. Her discreet but suggestive Helen Mirren-like strip was beautifully and bravely handled. She added considerably to the comic progress of the piece and her clear diction and projection ensured that
her performance was well noted.

This was a wonderfully funny piece of excellent ensemble playing. There were some very glorious moments of comic “business”. The bra strap being entangled in Philip Markham’s wrist, for example as he tried to thread the black bra through the louvered bedroom door, and the scene where “goosing’” was explained, were side-splittigly funny. As with the whole piece, the timing was first rate and the music and the lighting did their bit in creating the whole performance. Farce is a
hugely difficult format, but here is was, flowing along with consummate ease.

This is a slightly dated piece in the sense that it deals in a rather non-PC way with the issue of homosexuality. Although is was very well done, it did make me feel a little uncomfortable and was a sad echo of the kind of view that was common when the play was written. I can only hope that
any gay members of the audience felt we were laughing with them rather than at them. That said, this was a really excellent evening’s entertainment and it was gratifying to find the house almost full of appreciative and enthusiastic audience members.

One slight criticism. I felt a second curtain call was called for. This was a great performance and the level of enthusiastic and appreciative applause really demanded a second appearance of the cast so that we could say ‘thank you’ properly. As a company, you give huge amounts of your time
to such productions and we, your audience, would love to show our warm appreciation.”

Polly

move over mrs markham nomad theatre east horsley surrey

The post Move Over Mrs Markham – Polly reviews appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


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Saturday 14th October

Tickets – Adults £12, Children/Students £10

A fascinating drama about various people’s eating disorders, their lives, loves, hates and experiences. Brought together by a common denominator, all with different coping strategies, the play journeys from the past, to living in the present and how they all endeavour to show the world through humour, strength and resolve how to move forward to the future. This play gives a true and accurate insight into the minds and behaviours of different eating disorder sufferers, as it has been co-written by real life sufferers about their experiences and their road to recovery.

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The post Eat Me – presented by Matrix Theatre appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


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The Memory of Water by Shelagh Stephenson

The realistic, well observed and detailed set prepared us for an equally forensic examination of the lives and attitudes of the three daughters. Teresa, the oldest (Moyra Brookes) quickly established the character of the dutiful daughter relied upon by the two others to take on the responsibilities of caring for the ageing and latterly, hospitalised mum.  Her obsession with all things natural and organic is quickly established as is her irritation with and scorn for her siblings.

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Moyra Brookes played with great consistency, the very set of her head declared her supremacy among the sisters.  The head gradually lowered as she lost her composure completely when finally tempted by both a spliff and a quantity of whisky.  Her acid turn of phrase reached its most bitter as she revealed her “clever’ sister’s teenage pregnancy. The performance was sustained and developed throughout.  It was a well observed and entirely credible characterisation.  Although the butt of some of the comic moments she conveyed the frustration of many a sister who finds herself “in charge” of the older parents. Her portrayal of the woman unused to much liquor becoming slowly more and more drunk was excellent and totally convincing. This is very difficult to achieve on stage but she was entirely convincing and funny and tragic at the same time. The crumbling of the family cornerstone, as she saw herself, was very poignant.

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In the opening moments of the play we also met Mary.  She is revealed as an overcommitted and exhausted doctor trying to sleep off the last shift. Played by Sarah Mullins, this character was perhaps the most sober, unsmiling of all. Her obsession with one patient’s welfare impinged even upon her personal life, but there was a darker side to Mary as we learnt later.  Her sharp reposts and unsmiling expression carried through most of the play, but the revelation of the real tragedy came much later. Its announcement by Teresa was cruel and unvarnished.  Later, however, Teresa revealed the caring and more tender side of her nature as she told Mary of the hidden tragedy.  An explanation perhaps, for her taking on the responsibility of her mother’s wellbeing.

The third sister was the whirlwind of a character, Catherine, played by Helen Dixon.  She was the peripheral figure of the family as far as she was concerned and slightly written off by the other two sisters.  The role was played with huge energy and variety which was well sustained throughout. Her mercurial change of mood, her inventions of half truths were both the tragedy and the comedy of her life.  Her plea to be understood and loved was a  real crie de coeur, but laughed at by us probably because there is a bit of Catherine in us all

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The three sisters vie with varying degrees of vehemence for the “starring role” in all the half remembered family sagas of childhood.  The one thing they seem to agree on is that Mary was the favoured child, the one whose cleverness had to be protected and cosseted and who ultimately became a doctor.

The one thing that the daughters share is a disappointment in their relationships with men.  Theresa  has the most stable partnership with Frank.  He is the one she depends on for everything. He is her second husband and she chose him via a dating agency.  Frank (Murray Stephen) portrayed the tolerant and long suffering Frank with commitment and consistency.  He physically dominated the stage which was fortuitous given the character he played. His head was hung a little low so we rarely got a full face which was a shame.  He did however, play the comic moments with great success and prompted lots of laughter.  Even when finally standing up for himself he inspired laughter that rocked the studio.

Mike (Mike Ayres) made a hugely comic entry through the window.  A doctor having a long term affair with Mary, he came across as an affable and easy going even affectionate partner. He contributed well to the comedy, but ultimately he too made a considerable contribution to Mary’s sense of hopelessness. Essentially the most privileged of the sisters, she suffers the greatest sense of disappointment with life at the hands of the easygoing Mike.

Off stage as it were, there is Xavier, commonly referred to as Pepe much to the annoyance of Catherine.  Xavier is Catherine’s Spanish “boyfriend” but he too finally fails the ultimate test and abandons Catherine, in a brief telephone conversion.

I have left consideration of the character of the ghost of mother Vi (Elaine Burns) until last,  because in many ways she is the most important character in the play.  She visits Mary because as she says ‘I look at you and I see myself’ and gives the mother’s point of view. It was played with great clarity and sympathy and was the “glue” that held the story and indeed the production together.   The playing was very engaging and totally convincing.  The fact that we could “see the ghost” didn’t in any way upset one’s suspension of disbelief. Her interpretation gave stability and credence to the comedy.

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The interplay and ensemble playing was of a very high standard indeed. there were no weak moments and the comedy flowed almost until the end. There was a momentary touch of farce as Mike’s bright cerise bath towel towel slipped almost revealing all.  It was well timed whether it was deliberate or not, we shall never know.  However it added to the momentary revelations of flesh that were an integral part of the “family” at ease.  There were many moments of high comedy.  Too many to identify in detail, but Catherine seeking comfort from Frank as he lay exhausted on the bed and the sisters trying on their mother’s old clothes will remain in the memory for some time. Both scenes were highly comic and served to enhance the poignancy off the situation.

The costuming and set were, as always with Nomad productions, absolutely perfect.  Sound and lighting, suitably discreet, gave a delicate touch of icing on the cake. There is nothing “Am Dram” about this team.

 

Polly  6 July 2017

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The post The Memory of Water – Polly reviews appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


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Local theatre reviewer, Lola, reviews Oklahoma! 

“Bookham Light Opera Society chose wisely in offering Rodgers and Hammerstein’s first musical collaboration for their Nomad theatre production this year. With plenty of well known songs and opportunity for lively dances they were surely on to a winner.

The well organised set, together with the effective lighting and well designed costumes effectively established the scene of 1906 Oklahoma. The musicians led by James ‘Mr Music’ Marr underpinned the action perfectly and must take their share of the credit for an engaging production.

oklahoma review BLOS curly laurey

The casting was spot on, Melanie Kemp portrayed Laurey as both strong minded and vulnerable when the characterisation required it. Her singing raised the quality of the production. Michael Ayres‘ Curly was an interesting mixture of introspection and confidence in particular at the social where he shows his determination to win Laurey’s affections.

 

oklahoma review BLOS curly jud

I was much taken by John Beavis’ Jud. Slow and menacing, he is in contrast to the the more romantic things going on around him. John carried off the role wonderfully well. Joanne Silcox as Aunt Eller and Vykki Mash as Gertie both looked to be enjoying their roles as did Julian Warner-Edney (Will), and Colin Barnard (the ranch owner), and added to the gaiety of the show by the exuberance of their singing and dancing. A word for the ‘dream’ ballet sequence, Matt Gardner and Laura Thomson showed dancing ability and poise not always seen at the Nomad theatre.

oklahoma review BLOS laurey curley dream ballet

Richard Peachey again showed his gift for comedy in his portrayal of Ali Hakim whilst Sophie Johnstone almost stole the show with the consistentcy of energy and vigour in her scenes.

 

oklahoma review BLOS laurey ado annie

There are several set pieces in Oklahoma! that drive the story along: the principals have their songs, the dances are important to the entertainment and the plot must of course be made clear to the audience. Yet the running time of over two and a half hours was a tad long, maybe some judicious cutting might have been made without diminishing the enjoyment of the story.

Overall a competent production with fine singing and movement. I cannot finish this review without a word for Sid Dolbear‘s magnificent ‘tache which almost acted his eyebrows off the stage!”

Lola

Oklahoma! by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II

In association with Bookham Light Operatic Society Facebook Link
Directed by Jackie Shearer

oklahoma review BLOS ali hakim

 See more reviews here: Review pages

The post Oklahoma – Lola reviews appeared first on Nomad Theatre.


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When Love Grows Old

 

Close Quarter Productions, John B Hobbs and Theatre Reviva! in association with The Nomads present:

When Love Grows Old

The hit comedy double-bill direct from the Brighton Festival Fringe.
The event is a short double-bill, directed by Theatre Reviva! Artistic Director, Graham Pountney with Highly Recommended and 4-Star reviews.

‘The Romance of the Century’
features the most glamorous couple in the world, whose love story caused a national crisis.
‘The Weatherman’
– two old friends reflect on love and friendship, and try to remember someone’s name…

Buy tickets online now!

It’s direct from the Brighton Fringe Festival for 2 performances only on Friday June 9th and Saturday June 10th.
There’s also a Question and Answer session with the Author and the Director right after each show, included in the ticket price!

theatre reviva when love grows old

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